Blue Light Menace

I don’t think I’ll ever be truly able to escape the clutches of my smartphone. Even after divesting myself of social media and games, there’s still a huge chunk of my day-to-day activities that’s tied to the system, not counting the actual phone calls and text messages. For one thing, I do my daily expense recording on my phone. For another, that’s also where I do my language learning — currently French and Mandarin — especially handy to have during the down times. And finally, my podcasts and audiobooks. I tried switching to a dumb phone but it didn’t take.

Still, I have made some changes with my relationship. I don’t keep my phone by my bedside anymore. Before I turn in, I leave it in the living room to charge, right beside my tablet. Now it’s no longer the last thing I see at night nor the first thing I see in the morning.

The benefits were readily apparent. I’m able to sleep quickly at night, and soundly, too. When I wake up in the morning, I am more reflective and calm. There’s that feeling of peace when you’re all alone with your thoughts, nothing nagging and persisting for your attention.

Continue reading Blue Light Menace

The Nursing Trap

Giving words to what we already know, Filipino Nursing Graduates and the Risk of the Migration Trap discusses the Sisyphean struggle that aspiring Filipino nurses undergo in their search for a better life outside the country. The key argument are the two traps that they fall into:

The first is the migration trap…: aspiring migrants obtain specific credentials in the hope of working overseas, yet are unable to leave when labor demands or immigration requirements change…. Lacking public funds, Philippine hospitals could not offer permanent positions to the staggering number of nursing graduates within the country, leaving many unemployed and unable to obtain the work experience needed for jobs in alternative destinations like Japan and Singapore. Filipino nursing graduates caught in this situation then find themselves in an opportunity trap…: the never-ending need to collect credentials in order to secure a positional advantage in the job market.

Moreover, the author argues that rather than brain drain, it is a problem of brain waste as “…qualified nursing graduates find themselves in industries and jobs that have little need for their skills.”

Brutal.