Higher academia is a scam

…or so articles like these make me think: We Should Not Accept Scientific Results That Have Not Been Repeated. The article points to what is now known as the irreproducibility crisis, meaning, many of the findings published in high impact journals cannot be repeated. While not necessarily pointing to outright fraud, there are other possible reasons such as technical, statistical, and personal biases. The net of this is: scientists are driven by the need for recognition, and this can oftentimes skew results.

The Absurdist

A Mr. Beluga (pronounced Bel-yoo-guh) belted out the Tom Jones classic Delilah straight-faced while he played jacks and hopscotched on stage. It was strange, it was hilarious. The judges, a flamboyant gay host, a generic beautiful actress, a slurry spoken action star, and a corporate media boss, didn’t get it. Such a shame. It was great comedy and could have been much much more.

The Social Media Cancer

I get it: it’s hip to be railing against social media now that everyone and their mother is on it. That’s conventional wisdom anyway. But what if, just what if, there’s really something wrong with social media and we’re just ignoring the signs because we think we can’t do without it?

What if it were the people who started social media — who made social media what it is — already warning us about its adverse effects? Surely that deserves a hearing?

Sean Parker, creator of Napster and one of Facebook’s first investors, made a bit of a splash in the news back in November 2017 when he announced that he had become a conscientious objector to social media. After achieving much success, Parker began feeling the pangs of guilt. Parker confessed that the design of Facebook was “to consume as much of your time and attention as possible.”

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